Bodyboarding

Bodyboarding

Daniela Freitas
If you’ve tried surfing and are looking for something new, or just want to get out in the ocean and have some fun, you might want to check out bodyboarding. Pioneered in the 1970s by a man named Tom Morey, bodyboarding, or boogie boarding as it is also known, took off and now crowns both a male and female world champion.

Much like surfing, bodyboarding involves catching a wave and riding it through, although after that most of the similarities come to an end. Bodyboarders ride lying o­n their stomach in what is referred to as a prone position. Riding this way, as opposed to standing up, can allow for newer riders to feel the exhilaration of catching a wave much sooner than the sometimes arduous learning curve of surfing. That isn’t to say that bodyboarding is without its challenges. Professional bodyboarders have developed a number of tricks that can be performed. Early tricks focused o­n riders spinning o­n the face of the water, but as riders advanced in skill in and daring they attempted new airborne tricks, including flips and rolls.

Francirley
Bodyboards are traditionally made out of foam with a plastic bottom and two rods running through them in order to preserve stiffness. Due to their smaller size and easier construction, they can be purchased for less money than a comparable surfboard, o­nce again making it easier for beginners to enter the sport. While surfing often requires large waves in order for a good ride, bodyboarders need o­nly a tubular wave. These aspects make bodyboarding different enough that long time surfers can try it if they are looking for something new, and easy enough that new riders can get into the sport quickly.